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Can tech enable us to re-open in a CoViD-secure way?


It’s November 2020, and England is in the midst of its second national lockdown. Theatres, stadiums, museums, music venues and more are closed, and anyone who can is being encouraged to work from home.


However, with news of multiple CoViD-19 vaccines beginning to make headlines, it’s important to start looking at how we can enable audiences and office workers to return safely and securely to relatively crowded places.


Until now, the measures in place have largely focused around the wearing of PPE/masks, hand sanitiser, regular cleaning and social distancing, but increasingly technology is playing a vital role in the world of CoViD safety. It's becoming not just an investment, but an important part of making visitors and workers feel protected as they return to "normal" life. It's all about restoring consumer confidence.


Below are two temperature scanning technologies that are being used to mitigate the risks of returning to public places, and may well become mainstays in the months and years to come.


The Contactless Thermometer

Contactless thermometers are steadily becoming a solid investment for businesses looking to add additional safety features to their entryways.


The facial biometric thermometer uses non-contact human temperature measurement to ensure that no one enters the premises who might be having early CoViD-19 symptoms.


This nifty piece of tech is a smart purchase for business owners due to the fact that it can be used beyond the conclusion of the pandemic (which we hope won’t be too long!).


The contactless thermometer also functions as a facial recognition check-in system, with the ability to have up to 12,000 individuals pre-loaded into the database.


Thermographic Fever Detection Camera

The thermographic fever detection camera uses artificial intelligence to analyse large groups of people, such as entrance ways to football stadiums, theatres, shopping centres etc., scanning temperature and searching for signs of fever.


The camera can measure the temperatures of multiple people up to a 2m distance with a high degree of accuracy, and can be programmed to set off a “fever alarm” if a high temperature is detected.


Cameras such as this may well be a route to reopening venues and public spaces which would usually see a high volume of people, hard to be measured by individual members of staff without severely disrupting the flow of traffic.


Whatever the future of CoViD-19 security looks like, it’s clear that as a society we are facing challenges which won’t be solved overnight. As we look ahead to reopening public spaces and businesses, it’s clear that investments need to be made in changing infrastructure and processes to suit this new reality.


Check out our 'Entry Systems' page to learn more about temperature scanning tech.

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